A Guide to Aberdeen – Five Wonderful Attractions

by Dempsey
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Aberdeen, the “Silver City” of Aberdeenshire County, is located 117 km northeast of Edinburgh on the North Sea coast between the mouths of the Don and Dee rivers and is Scotland’s third-largest metropolis. Due to the enormous amount of crude oil that comes from the North Sea, it is often called the “oil capital of Europe”, giving it the status of Europe’s offshore capital. Aberdeen is also often referred to as the “city of granite” because of the buildings, which are largely built of pink and grey granite.

Aberdeen has a total population of around 212,125 inhabitants and ethnic groups including English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, Ulster, West Indians, Indians, Pakistanis and other peoples. The city experiences a temperate climate with an overall temperature of 7.1 degrees Celsius. From May to September is the best time to visit the city, with long hours of daylight.

Aberdeen International Airport is located in Dyce, 11 km from the city centre. It offers a wide range of domestic and international flights such as British Airways, BMI, Easyjet, etc. The buses are operated by First Group, Stagecoach Group and First Aberdeen, which share larger routes with 22 services running through the city. Aberdeen also offers regular train connections to Glasgow and Edinburgh, including long-distance trains to London. Regular trains run northwest to Inverness and north to Dyce for the airport.

1. Aberdeen Art Gallery

Aberdeen Art GalleryAberdeen Art Gallery, which presents a varied collection of artworks, such as that of the Impressionists and Scottish color specialists; Provost Ross’ House, the third oldest house in Aberdeen; The home of James Dun, now a museum with temporary exhibitions; Aden’s Country Park, which covers approximately 230 hectares on the 18th-century Buchan Domain; King’s College Conference Center; Provost Skene’s home, a good example of early bourgeois architecture; Braemar Castle, built-in 1628 by the Count of Mar; Doonies Farm, one of Scotland’s largest collections of endangered farm animals; the Northeast Falconry Visitor Center, with its spectacular falcons, owls and eagles, as well as regular demonstrations of daily flights; and Marischal College.

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2. The Maritime Museum

The Maritime MuseumThe history of Aberdeen is inextricably linked to the sea, ships and shipbuilding. The city is still an important port and is an integral part of the history of shipbuilding in Europe. Those who want to develop a better understanding of this story should visit Provost Ross’s home. The building, built centuries ago, houses an exceptional maritime museum with models, paintings, historical documents and other objects that reveal the history of fish, whales and fish. navigation in and around Aberdeen. The clippers from Aberdeen are one of the highlights of the museum visit. Aberdeen is a seaside resort and this museum highlights this reality by bringing history to life.

3. The Aberdeen Music Hall

The Aberdeen Music HallEvery guide in Aberdeen mentions the Music Hall. The venerable structure once housed the meeting rooms of the city, but since the mid-1500s it has been one of the most popular locations for music and art. The best orchestras in Scotland play regularly, as do the best pop artists and rock bands. The venue also hosts the annual Aberdeen International Youth Festival, one of the largest and most popular events in the city. If you spend more than a few days in Aberdeen, you are likely to get the chance to attend a show in this historic place.

4. The Aberdeen Sports Village

The Aberdeen Sports VillageWhile the Maritime Museum and the Music Hall emphasize the history of Aberdeen, the Aberdeen Sports Village is a testament to current dynamics. You will not find the “ASV” in an old Aberdeen guide, which has been open since 2009. This large-scale sports training site is a world-class training centre for the best athletes and a community resource in which all athletes participate. With the London Olympics in 2012, the Aberdeen Sports Village will certainly receive some of the world’s greatest players as they train for their events.

5. Aberdeen International Airport

Aberdeen International AirportAberdeen International Airport is located in Dyce, 11 km from the city centre. It offers a wide range of domestic and international flights such as British Airways, BMI, Easyjet, etc. The buses are operated by First Group, Stagecoach Group and First Aberdeen, which share larger routes with 22 services running through the city. Aberdeen also offers regular train connections to Glasgow and Edinburgh, including long-distance trains to London. Trains run regularly to the northwest to Inverness and to the north to Dyce for the airport.

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